Visualizing Big Data with recycled cardboard, junk mail, gallery cards and more. The awarded data artist Laurie Frick will be speaker in the Technarte Los Angeles edition

The data artist Laurie Frick, creating in the thin line between art and neuroscience will be speaker in the Los Angeles edition of the International Conference on Art and Technology . She uses self-tracking data that she analyzes for transforming the information into hand-built works, working with the two opposites, the most advanced technology and sprawling grids of cardboard, wood, and paper magazine fragments, recycled cardboard, hand towels, junk mail, gallery cards or old paper-back book covers among other materials.

With this amazing mix she creates poetic and sensitive visualizations of millions of data built from modest materials that look and feel familiar and hold a sensibility of time.

Laurie Frick

 

Using her background in engineering and high-technology she explores the future of the quantified-self where iphones and gadgets gather and present patterns of how we feel, stress level, mood and bio-function digitally recorded and physically produced as intelligent wallpaper.

“See your own data in a new way, I predict all that creepy surveillance will turn into an entirely new way to see yourself. Abstracted patterns of you as data portrait. Your brain can’t tell the difference…a data selfie is simply feeding the human loop that makes you feel alive. Take back your data and, turn it into art!”

The artist will present in Technarte Los Angeles different artworks and projects related to self-tracking data visualization.

Stress Inventory by Laurie Frick

Laurie Frick has been investigating the future of data about you, when it won’t be odd or strange to intimately know and see lots and lots of personal data about yourself.

Stress inventory

Stress inventory | 2015 | Laurie Frick

And recently she has been looking further into the future when data begins to operate on your behalf. Not creepy…. helpful, curious, maybe mind-bending in it’s ability to predict and see around the corner into the future.

These pieces play on recent studies that show simple daily stress has a long-term effect on future chronic health problems. What if you could imagine a little sliding scale as you watch all those irritating little stress events that poke at you on a daily basis. When the subway is late, or commuter traffic is ridiculous because it’s raining, or someone had the nerve to write a snarky comment on your post. Does it bother you a little bit, not at all or a lot?

Each dot is a day, and you might encounter one or maybe a handful of small stress in your daily inventory, color coded and sized by the amount of stress it caused. These are handcut leather on stretched linen. Sizes are all roughly 30″ x 36″ +|-. Legend and future health gauge are on the right and left edge.

Daily activities

Daily activities | 2015 | Laurie Frick